Communalism in India - A Harsh Reality

After witnessing the disheartening deadly communal riots during the process of creation of Pakistan by dividing India in 1947, Indian leader adopted secularism to prevent the menace from occurring again. Secularism has been a fundamental feature of the Indian Constitution since then.  This feature of secularism of the Indian Constitution played a great role in ensuring an emotional integration of the people of India, allowing the nation to ensure unity in diversity.

But, it is a harsh reality that communalism could not be totally eradicated from India. Communalism is present in India in various forms; chiefly as Hindu-Muslim communalism. Since India’s Independence in 1947, the nation suffered communal riots in various parts – from Kashmir to Kanya Kumari and from Gujarat to Assam. No part of India has been free from communalism.  Aligarh, Meerut, Hyderabad, Aurangabad, Patna and Malda all have emerged as epicenters of communalism at sometime.
 Communalism is generally associated with a selfish, narrow as well as aggressive attitude on the part of a religious group.

Apart from the Hindu-Muslim conflicts, India has suffered sectarian riots/violence, regional violence, tribal riots. What is more shocking is that there have been conflicts within different sects or factions of the same religion. For instance, Shia-Sunni conflict in Utter Pradesh, Sikh-Nirankari conflict in Punjab and Lepchas-Bhutias conflict in Sikkim.

Let me say, religious orthodoxy might be seen as the biggest cause of Indian communalism or communalism in India, but it is not the only cause. Politics and economic inequality also often play a hidden role in triggering communal riots in India and anywhere else in the world.

3/17/2016
Communalism in India - A Harsh Reality
After witnessing the disheartening deadly communal riots during the process of creation of Pakistan by dividing India in 1947, Indian leader adopted secularism to prevent the menace from occurring again. Secularism has been a fundamental feature of the Indian Constitution since then.  This feature of secularism of the Indian Constitution played a great role in ensuring an emotional integration of the people of India, allowing the nation to ensure unity in diversity.

But, it is a harsh reality that communalism could not be totally eradicated from India. Communalism is present in India in various forms; chiefly as Hindu-Muslim communalism. Since India’s Independence in 1947, the nation suffered communal riots in various parts – from Kashmir to Kanya Kumari and from Gujarat to Assam. No part of India has been free from communalism.  Aligarh, Meerut, Hyderabad, Aurangabad, Patna and Malda all have emerged as epicenters of communalism at sometime.
 Communalism is generally associated with a selfish, narrow as well as aggressive attitude on the part of a religious group.

Apart from the Hindu-Muslim conflicts, India has suffered sectarian riots/violence, regional violence, tribal riots. What is more shocking is that there have been conflicts within different sects or factions of the same religion. For instance, Shia-Sunni conflict in Utter Pradesh, Sikh-Nirankari conflict in Punjab and Lepchas-Bhutias conflict in Sikkim.

Let me say, religious orthodoxy might be seen as the biggest cause of Indian communalism or communalism in India, but it is not the only cause. Politics and economic inequality also often play a hidden role in triggering communal riots in India and anywhere else in the world.