Over-cooking May Increase Risk Of Cancer


Eating burnt toast, over-roasted potatoes or other starchy foods cooked at high temperatures can significantly increase the risk of cancer, the U.K. Food Standards Agency has warned.
www.letmesay.in image showing over-roasted toastThere is longstanding evidence from various animal studies conducted in the past that overcooked starchy foods, such as over-roasted toasts or potatoes, can significantly increase risk of cancer because overcooking produces high levels of a compound dubbed acrylamide.

Acrylamide makes starchy foods to turn golden in color when the food is baked, fried, toasted or roasted. Formed from simple sugars, such as glucose, acrylamide (which is found naturally in starchy foods) reacts with an amino acid known as asparagine, when a starchy food like potatoes or toasts are cooked at temperatures higher than 120 degrees Celsius.

If you cook a starchy food for too long at high temperatures, the food simply turn from golden to brown and eventually black in color. During the process, the food produces higher-than-prescribed levels of acrylamide compound, which pushes the risk of cancer up.

Thus, the FSA’s “Go for Gold” campaign advises people to cook their foods yellow or golden brown in color when frying, roasting or baking food; and not to allow it to turn darker in color.

The FSA also advises people to:

Follow cooking instructions mentioned on food packages to avoid overcooking.

Make sure they eat a balanced diet.


1/24/2017
Over-cooking May Increase Risk Of Cancer

Eating burnt toast, over-roasted potatoes or other starchy foods cooked at high temperatures can significantly increase the risk of cancer, the U.K. Food Standards Agency has warned.
www.letmesay.in image showing over-roasted toastThere is longstanding evidence from various animal studies conducted in the past that overcooked starchy foods, such as over-roasted toasts or potatoes, can significantly increase risk of cancer because overcooking produces high levels of a compound dubbed acrylamide.

Acrylamide makes starchy foods to turn golden in color when the food is baked, fried, toasted or roasted. Formed from simple sugars, such as glucose, acrylamide (which is found naturally in starchy foods) reacts with an amino acid known as asparagine, when a starchy food like potatoes or toasts are cooked at temperatures higher than 120 degrees Celsius.

If you cook a starchy food for too long at high temperatures, the food simply turn from golden to brown and eventually black in color. During the process, the food produces higher-than-prescribed levels of acrylamide compound, which pushes the risk of cancer up.

Thus, the FSA’s “Go for Gold” campaign advises people to cook their foods yellow or golden brown in color when frying, roasting or baking food; and not to allow it to turn darker in color.

The FSA also advises people to:

Follow cooking instructions mentioned on food packages to avoid overcooking.

Make sure they eat a balanced diet.